Ultra-Clydesdale.com

Ultra-Clydesdale.com


Big Runs - Bigger Runners!

About Us

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Keep Moving

 You don't have to run fast to be a real runner! John Bingham 

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History

 The Clydesdale category emerged in the 1980s after a Baltimore accountant analyzed runners in 10-kilometer and marathon races. He found that after men reached 170 pounds, their performance declined relative to their weight. This meant that a large, slower runner might actually be performing better than a smaller, faster runner. As a result, some smaller races began offering the Clydesdale category. Eventually the category was adopted by larger races such as the Marine Corps Marathon and the Portland Marathon. 

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Purpose

 The Clydesdale weight category serves a purpose similar to age and gender categories -- to allow competitors to compete with others who are at a similar running level. Jeffrey West, a 245-pound marathoner, told the "New York Times," "As a Clydesdale, you know you’re never going to win a race." But these larger competitors can compete against each other. This gives larger runners a competitive incentive in the race. 

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